ESPN and all other NBA media outlets are having a field day with the Jamal Murray and Kyrie Irving feud. Well… let me rephrase, the whining and complaining by Kyrie Irving about Jamal Murray. Yeah, that sounds better!

The Denver Nuggets defeated the Boston Celtics, 114-107, on Monday night behind an impeccable scoring effort by Murray. Murray dropped 48 points on the Celtics and was cooking any defender thrown at him. Even Marcus Smart could not help but get crossed up by Murray during that game. While most highlights wanted to focus on the shots Murray made, the main story came from a shot that he did not make.

The shot talked round the NBA

On the Nuggets’ final possession, they had built up a seven-point lead and the Celtics pulled back their defensive efforts. Usually, players either pass the ball around or simply dribble out the remaining clock. Well, Murray did not do that and he hoisted up a 30-footer that ricocheted off the rim as the buzzer sounded.

Nevertheless, shooting in those types of situations is viewed as insulting. The act is not taken kindly by opposing teams or media outlets. Murray’s shot was not perceived by Celtics guard Kyrie Irving who grabbed the ball and chucked it into the stands. He claimed Murray’s actions were immature and unprofessional, so the ball did not deserve to go to Murray, it deserved to be launched into the Pepsi Center crowd.

There are mixed feelings regarding Murray’s actions from Monday night. Many people believe he should not have taken the shot and taken the professional approach by dribbling out the clock. Others believe that Irving is simply being a sore loser and should have not let Murray shoot the ball. I’m going to give my take and explain why Jamal Murray was in the right to shoot the final shot.

He wanted to get “fitty”

Murray was on fire from the field on Monday night. He was finishing at the rim, hitting pull-up jumpers and launching daggers from distance. He was unguardable that night, which ultimately lead to Murray scoring 48 points.

Yes, 48 points is a lot of points and a great number for a scorer of Murray’s caliber. However, for all those people who did not play basketball, 48 points is not a 50-piece. Murray wanted the career-high of 50 points and I completely understand his thinking. Go search for any former player’s take on this decision and they will agree with Murray’s choice.

Is it considered disrespectful since the Celtics basically accepted defeat before the shot. Well… yeah I guess, but I was part of the Pepsi Center crowd that night and we were egging Murray on. We wanted to see him hit the half a century mark as it has not happened for a Nuggets since Carmelo Anthony almost a decade ago! Murray might have been booed (definitely exaggerating) for just dribbling the clock out and accepting a 48-piece.

Will Murray learn his “lesson”

Regardless of what anyone thinks, Murray took the shot and their is nothing anyone can do about it. People are going to agree with his decision and others will disagree. All I can say is scoring 50 points at the highest level of competitive basketball is not an easy task. So, if Murray finds himself at the doorstep of the 50-point club once again, I’ll expect him to shoot it once again.

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Content Creator at Armchair Denver Nuggets The Armchair All-Americans, LLC
I was born in Denver, Colorado and always aspired to be the first NBA player out of my little suburb south of Denver. Well, the NBA nor most DI programs were not looking for a 6’1 dude who played in the post all four years of high school. Despite falling a bit short of the NBA/DI goal, I did play collegiately at Colorado College from 2013 to 2015. As I grew up and I began to understand the game a bit more, I devoted my fandom to the Denver Nuggets. I have stood by their side through all of their ups and downs for the past 12 years. However, I know that year 13 is going to be a bit different as this team is on the fringe of becoming very special.
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Content Creator at Armchair Denver Nuggets The Armchair All-Americans, LLC
I was born in Denver, Colorado and always aspired to be the first NBA player out of my little suburb south of Denver. Well, the NBA nor most DI programs were not looking for a 6’1 dude who played in the post all four years of high school. Despite falling a bit short of the NBA/DI goal, I did play collegiately at Colorado College from 2013 to 2015. As I grew up and I began to understand the game a bit more, I devoted my fandom to the Denver Nuggets. I have stood by their side through all of their ups and downs for the past 12 years. However, I know that year 13 is going to be a bit different as this team is on the fringe of becoming very special.

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