Bring Yangervis Home

The 2018 season was not a good one for Yangervis Solarte. Fresh off a trade from the San Diego Padres to the Toronto Blue Jays, the utility infielder managed his worst season of his career. In 122 games, Solarte batted .226 / .277 / .378 with 17 home runs, 106 hits and 20 doubles. The .226 batting average is a drastic fall from a peak in San Diego at .286.

That season, he hit only 15 home runs, but his batting line was much more respectable. There is some speculation that Yangervis Solarte’s career may be over soon because of the drop in numbers. In the meantime, the Yankees need a utility placeholder infielder, and it is time to bring Solarte home.

The Yankees found Yangervis Solarte in December 2013 when they signed him as a favor to former big leaguer and his uncle, Roger Cedeño. In Spring Training, Solarte and fellow non-roster invitee Dean Anna hit the cover off the ball regularly.

Solarte and Anna’s performances allowed the Yankees to designate former heir to Derek Jeter Eduardo Nunez for assignment. The Minnesota Twins picked up Nunez on waivers at the end of Spring Training. Solarte inherited Nunez’s No. 26, which usually ends up with utility or fringe players.

Solarte hit .254 / .337 / .381 in a Yankee uniform, a 104 OPS+ performance. This included 64 hits, 14 doubles, and six home runs, with 31 RBI. In that time period, Solarte also managed the third triple play turned behind CC Sabathia.

This one was around-the-horn against the Rays, involving Brian Roberts and Scott Sizemore. Long-term, this may end up being Solarte’s defining Yankee moment. The Yankees traded Solarte and prospect Rafael de Paula for San Diego Padres third baseman Chase Headley.

San Diego and Yangervis Solarte seemed like a perfect fit. Solarte fit a need where the Padres could play him every day and he succeeded. The San Diego community embraced Solarte after his wife Yullette Pimentel, died on Sept. 17, 2016 from cancer.

Solarte, now a single father, had to play and raise his three kids by himself. The loss of his wife and his ability to play through such a struggle earned him the Tony Conigliaro Award for 2016, which awards overcoming large obstacles.

After the 2017 season, the Padres traded Solarte to the Toronto Blue Jays. The Toronto Blue Jays needed a utility infielder. Also, bringing him back in the American League East would help his offense. The results were similar home runs but a drop in batting average, along with fighting some injuries.

That said, the 2018 season became the Jays only season with Solarte as they declined the option that the Padres gave them in the contract. The Blue Jays later non-tendered him. Now, he is a free-agent.

The Yankees need a utility infielder to make up for the loss of Didi Gregorius for a few months of the season. He came down with a torn UCL after the 2018 American League Division Series. Now, the 2019 team needs a shortstop or second baseman. Neil Walker is probably not returning after a rough 2018 season in pinstripes. Solarte will come cheap, compared to a lot of options. On top of that, the Yankees know what they can expect.

There is nothing better than bringing Yangervis home, other than John Sterling’s poor abuse of “Volare”.

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Author Details
Adam Seth Moss is a graduate of Western Illinois University (WIU)with a Masters in History. Adam is the lead autosport writer and a guest writer for the River Avenue Blues blog. He is a fan of the Yankees and Mets and enjoys writing about baseball history, particularly the Yankees. On Armchair, he serves as the modern-day equivalent to the late Andy Rooney, having radical views on just about everything.
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Adam Seth Moss is a graduate of Western Illinois University (WIU)with a Masters in History. Adam is the lead autosport writer and a guest writer for the River Avenue Blues blog. He is a fan of the Yankees and Mets and enjoys writing about baseball history, particularly the Yankees. On Armchair, he serves as the modern-day equivalent to the late Andy Rooney, having radical views on just about everything.

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