Midland Lee High School wide receiver Loic Fouonji (2020) recently visited Texas Tech on Saturday, March 3 with his teammate, wide receiver Sheldon Bass Jr.

The Red Raiders became the first D-I school to offer Fouonji on Feb. 7, and he has since received offers from SMU and Arkansas. Fouonji told Armchair he had been to Lubbock numerous times, but he was glad to have his teammate Bass along to enjoy the time with.

“I always go to Lubbock for basketball tournaments. Plus my brother goes to school there, so I visit him a lot,” Fouonji said.

Fouonji told Armchair that he was able to see the weight room, the academic center, the Sports Performance Center, and the locker room during his visit. He also got to step foot inside Jones AT&T Stadium and watch some practice, which was his favorite part of the visit.

Texas Tech’s head coach Kliff Kingsbury made sure he was available to speak to recruits, so the two got to know each other a little.

“[Kingsbury told] me to keep on working on the field and in the classroom,” Fouonji said, “and that they are always watching.”

In the 2017 season, Fouonji recorded 18 receptions for 407 yards and five touchdowns. His longest reception of the year was for 64 yards, according to MaxPreps. Fouonji averaged 45.2 receiving yards per game and averaged 22.6 yards per catch for the season.

Lee finished the season with a 10-3 overall record and a 4-2 district record. The Rebels’ only losses came to San Angelo Central, Permian and Trinity. The Rebels also made it to the UIL 6A playoffs but lost to Trinity in the quarterfinals, 34-23, according to MaxPreps.

Fouonji plans to make history in high school, and while in Lubbock he got to step onto another field that has held a lot of history, especially with the wide receiver position, inside Jones AT&T Stadium.

“When I first walked into the stadium, I was amazed because I’ve never been on the field of a big stadium like that,” Fouonji said. “Then I watched the practice and I noticed that they threw the ball a lot to the receivers, and I like that a lot.”

As part of his visit, Fouonji was able to put on the Texas Tech uniform, which he said made him feel like he was a part of the team preparing for gameday.

During Junior Day, Texas Tech also revealed the 2018 introduction video that will be played before home games:

As a rising junior, Loic Fouonji still has a long road ahead in his recruitment process, but the Red Raiders have made an early stamp on the talented receiver. Check Fouonji out on Twitter here and Hudl here.

For quality up-to-date sports reporting, visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

Author Details
Hello, my name is Jack Densmore. I grew up as a kid watching the Alabama Crimson Tide with my dad, who basically introduced me into the sports world. As I grew up, I fell in love with the NFL and the Houston Texans, as well as other sports including basketball, baseball, hockey, and snowboarding. Other sports I’ve watched before, but those aren’t too interesting to me. As a kid, I played pee wee football and I was an offensive lineman/defensive lineman, basically it was given to me because I was the tallest kid. Afterwards, I didn’t feel like playing football anymore and ran for cross country for my middle school for a year. Short story, I was an average runner. Eventually, I joined the journalism world, and I’d rather write about the athletes than be an athlete, because they can do it better than me by a long shot.
×
Hello, my name is Jack Densmore. I grew up as a kid watching the Alabama Crimson Tide with my dad, who basically introduced me into the sports world. As I grew up, I fell in love with the NFL and the Houston Texans, as well as other sports including basketball, baseball, hockey, and snowboarding. Other sports I’ve watched before, but those aren’t too interesting to me. As a kid, I played pee wee football and I was an offensive lineman/defensive lineman, basically it was given to me because I was the tallest kid. Afterwards, I didn’t feel like playing football anymore and ran for cross country for my middle school for a year. Short story, I was an average runner. Eventually, I joined the journalism world, and I’d rather write about the athletes than be an athlete, because they can do it better than me by a long shot.

LEAVE A REPLY

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.