Last Sunday, St. Joseph’s defensive tackle Sean Morris came up from Hammonton to partake in Rutgers’ Junior Day visit.

Along with his first-team all-state St. Joesph teammate Wisdome Quarshie, Morris has begun to garner some significant interest from schools like Temple, Maryland, and Rutgers.

Projected as a 2019 recruit, Morris still has another year left to impress college scouts even more so than he has now.

Here is a quick evaluation on what Morris has to offer for the Scarlet Knights, and what he should work on during his senior year of high school.

Size him up!

Standing at 6-3, 280 pounds, Morris has a college level frame for a defensive tackle.

“A lot of the coaches were saying they were very excited about me,” Morris told ScarletNation.com.  “After the defensive line coach [Corey Brown] gets some time to look at some film on me, he should be in touch,” Morris said.

It would be hard not to imagine Brown being impressed by what he sees in Morris’ Hudl.com game tape, as the defensive tackle practically dwarves opposing offensive linemen.

Winning pedigree

Morris was a major contributor to St. Joseph’s 12-0 championship run in 2017, racking up a team-leading 6.5 sacks and 43 tackles.

Having played for not only one of the top high school programs in the state of New Jersey, but in the whole country, Morris brings an air of dominance and a winning culture wherever he goes.

Sneaky Speedster

You would not expect a 280 pound defensive tackle having the ability keep pace with offensive skills players, but with a sub 5.0 time on the 40-yard dash, Morris can just about outrun his competition.

On his Hudl.com game tape, Morris was able to make his way into the backfield, sacking the quarterback, force him to fumble, and take the rock all the way to the house for a long touchdown.

It is incredibly rare to find a defensive lineman with that kind of speed. It is even more rare to find it in an interior defensive lineman; whose only job is to stuff the run and take on double teams.

More than just football

While playing college football is Morris’ ultimate goal right now, he does not let it define him as just another football player.

Morris has a bit of a musical touch to him; being able to play both the flute and clarinet very well. He is also a bit of a greaser, as Morris likes to work on cars in his spare time.

Morris has also said that he wants to choose his school not just based on their football program, but on their academic standards as well.

He told Nj.com that “When coach [Chris] Ash came up towards the end, he was talking mostly about academic stuff, like life beyond football. He was talking about the different things they can [do to] help students while at the school and the support they provide.”

This shows how mature Morris is about his future. While he wants a chance to play college-ball (and possibly pro-ball), Morris knows the value of an education, and that it is always a good idea to plan for a life after football.

What Morris should work on

The only thing I feel that Morris should work on during his senior year is his technique. Speed and strength are tremendous tools for defensive linemen to have, and Morris knows how to use them to his advantage.

But from his game tape, I rarely saw Morris throw rips or swim moves against opposing linemen, relying more on his leverage over them to get through. Full-on physicality can only take you so far in college football. Big 10 linemen are towering foes, and pure strength and speed will not be enough to beat them off the ball.

Overall Assessment

Based on his game tape and overall abilities, Rutgers should seriously consider extending Morris his first college offer as soon as possible. He has all the physical tools and talent needed to play defensive tackle at a high level.

If he can just work more on his mechanics and become more technically sound on first contact, there is no reason that Morris does not rank as a four-star recruit, at least.

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Content Creator at Armchair Rutgers The Armchair All-Americans, LLC
There’s an old saying in sports fandom; “If you’re a fan of a winning team, you’re a fan of the winning. If you’re a fan of the losing team, then you’re a fan of the team.” And as an NYCFC, Mets, Jets, Knicks, and Rutgers fan, I might as well have that quote tattooed on my back in big bold letters. Winning is not a sports culture I’m familiar with. I haven’t felt the sensation of seeing my team hoist a championship, make a deep playoff run, or even just qualify for a playoff spot since I became a sports fan eight years ago. I’ve felt disappointment, heartbreak, frustration, and even fits of rage cheering for these teams (special shout out to the Knicks for that last one). But I can say with pride that my faith in these teams hasn’t wavered through the years, and it never will! No matter how hard I try.
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Content Creator at Armchair Rutgers The Armchair All-Americans, LLC
There’s an old saying in sports fandom; “If you’re a fan of a winning team, you’re a fan of the winning. If you’re a fan of the losing team, then you’re a fan of the team.” And as an NYCFC, Mets, Jets, Knicks, and Rutgers fan, I might as well have that quote tattooed on my back in big bold letters. Winning is not a sports culture I’m familiar with. I haven’t felt the sensation of seeing my team hoist a championship, make a deep playoff run, or even just qualify for a playoff spot since I became a sports fan eight years ago. I’ve felt disappointment, heartbreak, frustration, and even fits of rage cheering for these teams (special shout out to the Knicks for that last one). But I can say with pride that my faith in these teams hasn’t wavered through the years, and it never will! No matter how hard I try.

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