Last December, Rutgers pulled off another steal on the recruiting trail as the Scarlet Knights were able to snatch 4-star athlete Daevon Robinson from the Baylor Bears.

Robinson was originally committed to NC State, but reopened his commitment in November. With Rutgers and Baylor competing for the 6-4, 215 pound Medford, New Jersey native, the hometown school ultimately won out.

“I am staying home to protect the fence,”

Robinson told nj.com. Robinson will be able to join spring training with the rest of the 2018 recruiting class, hoping to get up to speed with Ash’s offensive system.

In an interview with nj.com, Rutgers head coach Chris Ash gave a simple reason as to why Robinson chose the Knights over the Bears.

 

https://twitter.com/daevon_7/status/942930111518662665
Twitter, @daevon_7

“He was basically saying like ‘it would be good to stay home, play in front of all my family and friends,’” said Ash. “’If I away, I could not play in front of all my family, friends and coaches. And they are really doing something big over here, building up something great and he wants me to be a part of it.’”

With so much excitement and optimism over Robinson’s potential impact for Rutgers, let us break what Robinson brings to the table.

Size

It is no surprise that Robinson’s height and weight give him a significant advantage over opposing players. At 6-4 and 215 pounds, Robinson is tall enough to make the most difficult catches look easy. If a 50/50 ball was thrown at him, count on Robinson coming down with the rock.

Robinson’s weight is also a major asset for him. As a big-bodied receiver, Robinson is able to use his momentum to push himself forward for extra yardage. In one play in particular on his HUDL.com page, Robinson made a simple comeback catch down the middle, then trucked three defenders for another five yards. It is safe to say that there is not a defensive back that would want to tackle this monster of a pass catcher.

Hands like Allstate

In his highlight reel, Robinson bobbled a catch during a curl route as the Z-receiver. Yet, he showed a remarkable focus to not only re-establish ball control but to do so while fighting for extra yardage with two defenders coming right at him.

https://twitter.com/daevon_7/status/917733266739945472
Credit @daevon_7 Twitter

Robinson’s hands are what makes him so deadly in the passing game. Robinson is at his best when he primarily runs curls, short slants, in routes and out routes. They may only get him short yardage gains, but they are some of the hardest routes to run in a receiving tree. They not only require good footwork and discipline but great hands. Usually, in these types of short routes, the quarterback has to fire a bullet pass into a small window for the receiver to catch it before the guy in coverage has a chance to break it up.

Robinson’s hands are soft and sturdy enough to cradle the ball from any angle that it is thrown to him; whether it is on an outside shoulder, high over his head, low to the ground, or far into the inside, Robinson can make the catch with ease.

Where can’t he play?

Throughout high school, Robinson was a versatile weapon on the football field. On offense, he could play wide receiver from any position. Whether it was as an X, Slot, or Flex receiver, Robinson could line up anywhere on the field. He was also used as an occasional H-back, helping create holes on the line of scrimmage for ball carriers to go through. He could also carry the ball when he needed to, playing as a power back when in the backfield.

Robinson also plays on the defensive line. Last year, he racked up 48 tackles, one sack, and a forced fumble.

A lineman that can catch

One of the most underrated skillsets that a receiver has to have is the ability to block. You can run crisp routes like Antonio Brown, run as fast as Tarik Hill, and even jump as high as Odell Beckham, Jr. However, if you cannot make a downhill block or help open running lanes for your running back, you are not a complete receiver.

Robinson has shown to be a tremendous blocker. He has good hand placement, never stops chopping his feet, and does not give up on the play. His ability to block so well also demonstrates how selfless he is on the gridiron. He is not a receiver that would complain about not getting the ball enough or that he should not need to block so much. That shows an upside in his character and overall attitude.

What Robinson can work on

If I had to cherry pick one thing that Robinson can work on, it is his speed. Robinson is not exactly a fast receiver. He is strong enough to break containment and has good footwork to ankle break defenders, but he does not have that game-changing speed that would allow him to burn defenders on the way to the house.

Robinson does not need speed for his style of play, though. He relies on strength, leverage, and clever tactics to win his battle against cover corners and safeties. But if he wants to become an even more dangerous weapon for the Scarlet Knights than he already is, he should work on getting his speed up.

Final Assessment

Overall, Robinson is one of the best receiving threats Rutgers has this season. He is big, strong, a great blocker, a tough competitor, selfless on the gridiron, and an overall tremendous athlete.

For quality up-to-date sports reporting, visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter.

Content Creator at Armchair Rutgers The Armchair All-Americans, LLC
There’s an old saying in sports fandom; “If you’re a fan of a winning team, you’re a fan of the winning. If you’re a fan of the losing team, then you’re a fan of the team.” And as an NYCFC, Mets, Jets, Knicks, and Rutgers fan, I might as well have that quote tattooed on my back in big bold letters. Winning is not a sports culture I’m familiar with. I haven’t felt the sensation of seeing my team hoist a championship, make a deep playoff run, or even just qualify for a playoff spot since I became a sports fan eight years ago. I’ve felt disappointment, heartbreak, frustration, and even fits of rage cheering for these teams (special shout out to the Knicks for that last one). But I can say with pride that my faith in these teams hasn’t wavered through the years, and it never will! No matter how hard I try.
×
Content Creator at Armchair Rutgers The Armchair All-Americans, LLC
There’s an old saying in sports fandom; “If you’re a fan of a winning team, you’re a fan of the winning. If you’re a fan of the losing team, then you’re a fan of the team.” And as an NYCFC, Mets, Jets, Knicks, and Rutgers fan, I might as well have that quote tattooed on my back in big bold letters. Winning is not a sports culture I’m familiar with. I haven’t felt the sensation of seeing my team hoist a championship, make a deep playoff run, or even just qualify for a playoff spot since I became a sports fan eight years ago. I’ve felt disappointment, heartbreak, frustration, and even fits of rage cheering for these teams (special shout out to the Knicks for that last one). But I can say with pride that my faith in these teams hasn’t wavered through the years, and it never will! No matter how hard I try.

LEAVE A REPLY

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.