New Jersey has developed a reputation for being an excellent producer of athletic talent over the years for almost every major sport in the country; NBA legend Shaquille O’Neal (Newark), MLB All-Star Mike Trout (Vineland), NASCAR’s Martin Truex Jr (Mayetta) and FIFA’s Carli Lloyd, all hail from the Garden State.

Recently, though, New Jersey has become a land rich with college football talent. High school football factories like Bergen Catholic, Don Bosco Prep and Paramus Catholic produce top recruits each year, many of which go on to play for highly touted college programs (Drew Singleton to Michigan, Jonathan Taylor to Wisconsin, Tommy DeVito to Syracuse, etc.).

One of the state’s more underrated programs, Woodrow Wilson High School (Camden), has also been known to produce quality players. One of their alumni, Mike Rozier, went on to win the 1983 Heisman Trophy with the Nebraska Cornhuskers. Highly touted 2019 quarterback Nick Kargman hopes to be the next player from Woodrow Wilson to be awarded the coveted trophy.

The 6-3, 175 pound Kargman posted on his Twitter account early Sunday night that he received a scholarship offer from Rutgers head coach Chris Ash. Ash extended the offer as a result of Kargman’s successful junior season, in which he has led the Tigers to a Dec. 1 state title appearance.

“It means so much with my first offer being from my home state,” Kargman told 247 Sports. “I have a lot of guys that I’m friends with there and Travon (King) is committed there. All of that makes it more worth it.”

Kargman’s been labeled as a dual-threat quarterback, and his game tape proves as much. Kargman is a naturally-gifted athlete. As a passer, he possesses good arm strength, with his best throws coming from long passes down the line and post-routes down the middle. Kargman is also crafty in the pocket. He escapes pocket breakdowns and pressure, helping stretch plays to find an open receiver. As a runner, Kargman isn’t your typical dual-threat quarterback; he rarely plays the option. Kargman operates mainly in shotgun and pistol formations and prefers to pass the ball rather than run it. He likes to air it out and only sees running as a secondary option in case he needs to buy time for his receivers or sees an open lane down the field.

Of course, Kargman isn’t without fault. While he has a great long ball, Kargman has room for improvement on intermediate and short routes. Throwing for long gains is great for highlight reels and wowing the crowd, but in a game of strategy and deception, mastering the routes that move the chains is absolutely essential. His throwing motion is also a bit slow; Kargman needs to develop a quicker release of the ball in order to avoid turnovers.

Rutgers already has a 2018 4-star recruiting steal in quarterback Artur Sitkowski, who flipped his commitment from Miami to the Scarlet Knights last month, becoming the crown jewel for Ash’s 2018 recruiting class. Along with freshman bright spot Johnathan Lewis, Kargman will have to embrace competition at quarterback if he comes to Rutgers in 2019. But based on his Hudl game tape, it’s safe to say Kargman will have ample opportunity to win the starting position at his home state university.

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Rutgers Recruiting Beat Writer
Content Creator at Armchair Rutgers The Armchair All-Americans, LLC
There’s an old saying in sports fandom; “If you’re a fan of a winning team, you’re a fan of the winning. If you’re a fan of the losing team, then you’re a fan of the team.” And as an NYCFC, Mets, Jets, Knicks, and Rutgers fan, I might as well have that quote tattooed on my back in big bold letters. Winning is not a sports culture I’m familiar with. I haven’t felt the sensation of seeing my team hoist a championship, make a deep playoff run, or even just qualify for a playoff spot since I became a sports fan eight years ago. I’ve felt disappointment, heartbreak, frustration, and even fits of rage cheering for these teams (special shout out to the Knicks for that last one). But I can say with pride that my faith in these teams hasn’t wavered through the years, and it never will! No matter how hard I try.
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Content Creator at Armchair Rutgers The Armchair All-Americans, LLC
There’s an old saying in sports fandom; “If you’re a fan of a winning team, you’re a fan of the winning. If you’re a fan of the losing team, then you’re a fan of the team.” And as an NYCFC, Mets, Jets, Knicks, and Rutgers fan, I might as well have that quote tattooed on my back in big bold letters. Winning is not a sports culture I’m familiar with. I haven’t felt the sensation of seeing my team hoist a championship, make a deep playoff run, or even just qualify for a playoff spot since I became a sports fan eight years ago. I’ve felt disappointment, heartbreak, frustration, and even fits of rage cheering for these teams (special shout out to the Knicks for that last one). But I can say with pride that my faith in these teams hasn’t wavered through the years, and it never will! No matter how hard I try.

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