Another Overwatch World Cup has come and gone. And with it, South Korea retained their title as the best Overwatch country in the world. This BlizzCon produced some of the most memorable upsets ever, and the emergence of China and the United Kingdom as nations to take seriously. Let’s recap the World Cup round by round for those who missed it.

Quarterfinals:

United States vs. United Kingdom (3-1 to UK)

Fusions made the most of his call-up to the UK squad because his main tank work produced the greatest upset in competitive Overwatch history. It may have taken a while to gain speed, and overcome USA’s cockiness on Illios and King’s Row, but Fusion’s Reinhardt landed shatter after shatter, and the Brits had the better GOATS play, which is running three tanks and three supports. As a result, Team USA would resort to some panic compositions, trying to get to the point as fast as possible without having ultimates to work with. It’s a shame, because this was supposedly the best lineup the Americans have sent to the World Cup so far, showing strong flexibility on all matter of compositions. But they looked too far ahead to the Koreans, not seeing the opponent in front of them as a proper team.

Canada vs. France (3-0 to Canada)

I predicted the Canada-France game would be the closest of the quarterfinal matches. It turned out Canada looked as dominant as they did last year, showing a much superior hero pool to France’s reliance on the GOATS comp. The Canadian DPS players Mangachu, Agilities and Surefour were not afraid to abuse sightlines and whatever limited mobility France had. France’s main playmakers, Benbest, Soon and Poko were mostly silent, with Canada quick to shut down and outplay the French strategies when it mattered.

China vs. Finland (3-0 to China)

If there were any doubts about the Chinese team at this BlizzCon, they were put to rest after rolling over Finland. In front of representatives of the new Chinese OWL teams, China was able to outlast the Finns thanks to timely support ultimates and capitalizing on Finland’s mistakes. Guxue again proved he’s one of the best rising main tanks with Leave and Krystal not afraid to flex onto multiple DPS heroes. Finland, as another team that relied mostly on GOATS, along with using Davin for all the maps, at least got use out of Symmetra on Hanamura.

South Korea vs. Australia (3-0 to SK)

In the South Korea-Australia match, Australia hoped running some bizarre compositions, like Trill on Wrecking Ball and Custa on Torbjorn, would catch Korea off-guard, along with a reliance on Mercy and Ana as their supports. Korea, however, was too quick to capitalize on the Australian’s positioning errors and delays. They even ran a few odd compositions themselves to see if they could get away with it.

Semifinals:

South Korea vs. United Kingdom (2-0 to SK)

If you can defeat the USA and draw South Korea on two maps, I’d call that a successful World Cup campaign. Team United Kingdom did not show as much flexibility as the Koreans, but when they ran tank-heavy compositions, the Brits appeared to be better. Fusions, MikeyA and KYB were the team’s stars, but they could not match the variety Korea brought to the table.

China vs. Canada (3-0 to China)

China had no such hesitation in defeating Canada, quickly exploiting the weaknesses of the Canadians and managing their ultimate economy better. Leave was the standout, racking up kill after kill on Doomfist and McCree. Guxue’s Winston and Reinhardt play lead a team that was so in sync with each other. Canada tried, relying a lot on the Sombra/Doomfist meta to break through China, but positioning errors lead to the clean sweep.

Finals:

South Korea vs. China: (4-0 to SK)

In the first all-Asian BlizzCon finals, the South Korea vs. China match had plenty of hype surrounding it, but Korea was running on all cylinders. Like every other instance this tournament, Korea had better ultimate efficiency and technical skill in running Brigitte compositions than the Chinese. For all the tricks China tried out, like running Wrecking Ball and Bastion on some maps, Korea tore them apart. Having a roster of all Overwatch League players compared to Chinese contenders players helped. So now, we wait another year to see if anyone can dethrone Korea. For China, their future as an Overwatch country looks bright.

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A guy born and raised in Buffalo who loves to write, play video games, watching Arsenal Football Club and watch enjoyably bad movies. I would also like to travel around the world to see what it has to offer. I’m trying to make something new out of my life by writing about video games, mainly Overwatch, which I play too much of, after writing for other websites and newspapers. Tank and support player by trade since everyone wants to play DPS. And desperate to break out of gold-ranking. My other work can be found at www.robcreenan.com. Feel free to reach me at [email protected] or @RobertCreenan on Twitter.
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A guy born and raised in Buffalo who loves to write, play video games, watching Arsenal Football Club and watch enjoyably bad movies. I would also like to travel around the world to see what it has to offer. I’m trying to make something new out of my life by writing about video games, mainly Overwatch, which I play too much of, after writing for other websites and newspapers. Tank and support player by trade since everyone wants to play DPS. And desperate to break out of gold-ranking. My other work can be found at www.robcreenan.com. Feel free to reach me at [email protected] or @RobertCreenan on Twitter.

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