Seattle Mariners second baseman Robinson Cano has been suspended by Major League Baseball.

Seattle Mariners second baseman Robinson Cano has been suspended for 80 games for violating the league’s joint drug policy. The report originally came from an off-the-record source in the Dominican Republic.

The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal has since confirmed the report. An official announcement from Major League Baseball is expected to come out soon.

Cano left Sunday’s contest (May 13) after being hit in the hand with a pitch. The Mariners since placed the eight-time All-Star on the 10-day disabled list with a fractured bone in his right hand.

The news comes as the Mariners are 23-17 and playing surprisingly good baseball. Cano had appeared in 39 games and was slashing .287/.385/.441 with four home runs and 23 runs driven in.

Cano is already expected to be out for four-six weeks with his hand injury, however, he can use this time on the disabled list towards his suspension time. This also means that should the Seattle Mariners make the playoffs, Cano will not be allowed on the playoff roster.

The 35-year-old second baseman out of the Dominican Republic is a career .304 hitter and has slashed 305 career home runs with 1,206 runs driven in. He is 583 hits away from the historic 3,000 mark. He won a World Series in 2009 as a member of the New York Yankees.

Back in December 2013, Cano signed a 10-year, $240 million deal with the Mariners. He is still owed $144 million and has six more years on his contract.

Here is an official statement from Robinson Cano on the suspension.

This story will be updated as we get more news on the specifics on why Robinson Cano was suspended.

Update 3:16 pm: Jerry Crasnick with more information about the failed drug test.

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What’s up Armchair All-American readers. My name is Nick Stevens and I call the great state of Virginia home. I’ve been an avid Orioles’ fan since childhood. The first time I ever went to Camden Yards I saw Sidney Ponson pitch and was convinced he was an amazing pitcher. Luckily, my baseball IQ and tastes have developed. I’m a teacher, turned writer, who is enjoying every second of this journey. When I’m not watching baseball, which is a rarity, I’m watching mid-major college sports. Welcome to baseball season folks. Grab a Natty Boh and let’s talk Orioles’ baseball. See you at Camden Yards!
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What’s up Armchair All-American readers. My name is Nick Stevens and I call the great state of Virginia home. I’ve been an avid Orioles’ fan since childhood. The first time I ever went to Camden Yards I saw Sidney Ponson pitch and was convinced he was an amazing pitcher. Luckily, my baseball IQ and tastes have developed. I’m a teacher, turned writer, who is enjoying every second of this journey. When I’m not watching baseball, which is a rarity, I’m watching mid-major college sports. Welcome to baseball season folks. Grab a Natty Boh and let’s talk Orioles’ baseball. See you at Camden Yards!
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