Baltimore Orioles prospect Cedric Mullins made his MLB debut last night, producing a night to remember.

Do yourself a favor and maybe don’t take a look at the score of last night’s Baltimore Orioles game. Instead, take a look at the line centerfielder Cedric Mullins produced in his Major League Baseball debut. 

Nerves clearly didn’t affect him. Not only was he making his pro debut, Cedric Mullins was replacing the Orioles’ all-time leader in games started and innings played in centerfield, Adam Jones (who has now shifted over to rightfield). Mullins went three for four with a walk, and two of his hits doubles. He’s already entered the Orioles record book, becoming the first Oriole to collect three hits in their MLB debut.

Line Drive Hitter

In his first major league AB, Mullins came up to bat with the O’s already down 3-1, and runners on first and second. It took Mullins only three pitches to get his first hit. The first pitch, a called strike on a curveball out of the zone. The second pitch, a cutter out of the zone he didn’t chase. The third? A 97 mph fastball that he hammered down the right field line for a double.

His second at-bat went similarly to the first. Three pitches and another pitch hammered down right field, this one a bit more shallow. I have a feeling we’ll be seeing a lot more of that. 

Mullins showed patience in his third time up to the plate, when he rallied back from a 1-2 count to work a walk. Finally, on his fourth plate appearance, Mullins appeared mortal. He hit a flyout to left-center field.

His fifth and final plate appearance came in the bottom of the 9th, with two outs and the Orioles down a depressing score of 19-11. Rather than go out with a whimper, Mullins hit the ball deep for a double. He came home when his teammate Jonathan Villar, hit a single to bat him in.

Mullins Has Speed

Mullins didn’t only show off his bat. He also displayed the speed and range he regularly displayed in the minors.

Just how fast is Mullins? On a ball hit to the outfield, he had an elite 30 feet/second sprint speed. For perspective, the two fastest players in Baseball, Byron Buxton and Billy Hamilton have posted a 30.6 and 30.1 feet/second sprint speed this season.

While he didn’t catch the ball, he traveled 111 feet in 5.3 seconds, showing off his very impressive range, as the ball tipped off his glove. Statcast considered that catch to have a 0% catch probability. This means that balls hit similarly have never been caught in the three years of observed data.

The fans loved him. His teammates loved him. What’s not to like?

Adam Jones and other teammates had nice exchanges with him, the highlight being Jones letting Mullins lead the team out of the dugout. Fans should definitely get excited about Mullin’s future.

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Content Creator at Armchair Baltimore Orioles , The Armchair All-Americans, LLC
My name is Jakob Lucas, and I am a lifelong Orioles fan. I was born at the dawn of the dark ages, so I did not know a winning Orioles team until 2012. I am fortunate to live a few miles from Camden Yards and when I can score some tickets, find myself there on a humid summer night screaming my throat raw. In my writing, my love for baseball collides with my passion for data and analytics. I dig deep into the data and utilize sabermetrics, leaving my fandom at the door. My ultimate goal is to work in an analytics department for a major league team, and I’m working towards that by pursuing a Statistics and Financial Economics Dual Degree at UMBC. Follow me on Twitter @jakoblucas1 if you want to hear more of my thoughts about Baseball and the Orioles.
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Content Creator at Armchair Baltimore Orioles , The Armchair All-Americans, LLC
My name is Jakob Lucas, and I am a lifelong Orioles fan. I was born at the dawn of the dark ages, so I did not know a winning Orioles team until 2012. I am fortunate to live a few miles from Camden Yards and when I can score some tickets, find myself there on a humid summer night screaming my throat raw. In my writing, my love for baseball collides with my passion for data and analytics. I dig deep into the data and utilize sabermetrics, leaving my fandom at the door. My ultimate goal is to work in an analytics department for a major league team, and I’m working towards that by pursuing a Statistics and Financial Economics Dual Degree at UMBC. Follow me on Twitter @jakoblucas1 if you want to hear more of my thoughts about Baseball and the Orioles.
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