Atlanta Hawks guard Tyler Dorsey was charged with driving under the influence of intoxicants over the weekend in Eugene, Oregon.

Dorsey, a 2017 second-round pick out of Oregon, was reportedly driving his Land Rover Discovery with his lights off on early Saturday morning.

“The vehicle came to a rolling stop, and then rolled forward again before coming to a complete stop,” the police report said, according to KVAL. “Upon speaking with Dorsey, the officer suspected impairment. There was an open container of alcohol on the passenger side floorboard. After an investigation, Dorsey was charged with DUI, Driving without Lights, and Open Container.”

The Hawks then issued a statement, which was released by WSB-TV’s Zach Klein.

“We are aware of the situation involving Tyler Dorsey that occurred this past weekend in Eugene, Oregon,” the statement read. “We are still gathering information as it pertains to the situation, and out of respect for the legal process, we will have no further comment at this time.”

Dorsey was charged with the DUI, driving without lights, and open container. Despite that, he was actually not arrested over the weekend, according to AJC reporter Chris Vivlamore.

Dorsey on the court

While an athlete at the University of Oregon, Dorsey earned the nickname “Mr. March” by ending his college career with a streak of eight consecutive 20-plus point games. In the 2017 NCAA Tournament, Dorsey hit many go-ahead and key late baskets to carry the Ducks all the way to the elite eight.

In his first NBA season with the Hawks, Dorsey went back-and-forth between the G-League and the Atlanta roster. Once the #Schlenk was in its final stages, Dorsey received more playing time and even averaged 16.5 points per game in the month of April.

What this means for the Hawks

The Hawks are a quiet team in a hypothetical and literal sense. Outside of Dewayne Dedmon and Kent Bazemore, most of the team stays to themselves and aren’t very vocal compared to young stars like Donovan Mitchell, Ben Simmons, or Joel Embiid.

Former Hawks head coach Mike Budenholzer played off of the “one team” method as opposed to the star system that has become so popularized in today’s NBA. In other words, the Hawks don’t have any overbearing egos not named Dennis Schroeder on the roster as of today. The Hawks don’t have an image. The only identity they have is they are one of the younger teams in the league who has been tanking to finally get over the postseason hump prior Hawks teams was able to get over.

The Hawks are supposed to be, in all honesty right now, quiet, young, and irrelevant. The league knows and respects the talent the Hawks have. The league also knows the franchise needs a couple of more pieces to make it actually work someday. The Dorsey charges, along with Schroder’s battery charges shines a negative light on this team. They are supposed to be laying low at the moment. They should be setting up a pitch for big-name free agents to come to Atlanta.

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Author Details
Content Creator at Armchair Atlanta Hawks , The Armchair All-Americans, LLC
Life growing up as an Atlanta sports fan prepared me for the worst. Consistent moments of cliff-hanging excitement ultimately leading to crushing heart ache time-after-time soften the blows of life’s disappointments. Any number of rejection letters for internship programs or scholarships I received while I was a student at Georgia State University didn’t compare to seeing the Hawks going to 10 consecutive postseasons with zero conference finals wins or the Braves winning 14 consecutive division titles with only one world championship to show for it. I grew up in the era where Mike Vick emerged as king, before becoming Inmate No. 33765-183- and so goes life.
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Content Creator at Armchair Atlanta Hawks , The Armchair All-Americans, LLC
Life growing up as an Atlanta sports fan prepared me for the worst. Consistent moments of cliff-hanging excitement ultimately leading to crushing heart ache time-after-time soften the blows of life’s disappointments. Any number of rejection letters for internship programs or scholarships I received while I was a student at Georgia State University didn’t compare to seeing the Hawks going to 10 consecutive postseasons with zero conference finals wins or the Braves winning 14 consecutive division titles with only one world championship to show for it. I grew up in the era where Mike Vick emerged as king, before becoming Inmate No. 33765-183- and so goes life.

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