Quin Snyder’s long road to NBA glory

Quin Snyder is one of the most promising coaching minds in the NBA. He's fresh off of his first playoff appearance and is on the verge of another. What many don't know is his journey to get there.

0
Riding a 10-game winning streak, Quin Snyder and the Utah Jazz find themselves 29-28 after a slow 19-28 start to the season. The Jazz emergence goes hand in hand with the patience Snyder has shown with his team this season.
Whether it’s sticking with Ricky Rubio despite a slow start, or putting his faith into a rookie.Donovan Mitchell is playing at an elite level. A key to that is Snyder’s willingness to go all-in with a young player. Most coaches in the NBA get tricked into the facade of mediocrity. Often resorting to playing veterans heavy minutes and letting young players develop in the shadows.
On the contrary, Snyder has recognized that the Jazz’ present and future will go as far as Mitchell takes them. Being able to put that trust into such a young player takes a massive amount of patience. A trait that has taken Snyder from NCAA Investigations to becoming one of the brightest NBA minds in the NBA. His journey to being an NBA head coach was a turbulent path, somehow he’s persevered through it all.

Getting his start

Quin Snyder broke into the NBA in 1992 as an assistant coach for the Los Angeles Clippers. However, he only lasted in LA for one season.
After leaving LA, Snyder made the decision to go back to Duke University to earn his MBA. While in Cameron, Snyder joined Coach Mike Krzyzewski as an assistant. He’d spend the next six years under the tutelage of Coach K, taking knowledge from one of the greats.
In 1999, Quin Snyder became the new men’s basketball head coach at the University of Missouri. Things got off to a hot start for Snyder at Mizzou. He led The Tigers to the NCAA Tournament in his first four seasons. They got further in the tournament in each of the first three seasons, including a trip to the Elite Eight in 2002.
The Tigers missed the NCAA tournament in 2004. After the season, Snyder’s name emerged in seventeen allegations of illegal recruiting. The allegations incited Snyder of sending gifts illegal gifts to recruit Ricky Clemons. Which he later admitted to. The Missouri program received a three-year suspension as a result of the investigation.
The stain that the suspension left on the Missouri program left a bad taste in the schools mouth. Missouri got off to a 10-11 start to the 2005-2006 season. Snyder resigned from the University of Missouri midway through his sixth season.
Fresh off a disastrous end to his tenure in Missouri, Snyder took a head coaching job in the NBA’s D-League. He took over the head coaching responsibilities for the Austin Toros going into the 2007 season.
Much like the beginning of his Missouri career, he got off to a great start in Austin. The Toros reached the D-League Championship in Snyder’s first season. The following season, Snyder took home D-League Coach of the Year honors.

More recent endeavors

From 2010-2014, Snyder bounced around as an Assistant coach. He had stints with the Philadelphia 76ers, Los Angeles Lakers, Atlanta Hawks and even overseas in Moscow with CSKA Moscow. During his time in Atlanta and Los Angeles, Snyder began getting recognition for his bright basketball mind. He quickly rose to the top of the list of prospects en route to head coaching jobs.
Quin Snyder’s NBA dreams came true when he took over as the head coach of the Jazz during the Summer of 2014. He inherited a young roster that featured Rookies Rodney Hood and Dante Exum. There were already two building blocks for him in Utah. Gordon Hayward and Rudy Gobert were waiting in the wings.
His first two seasons didn’t begin with huge success like his starts in Missouri and Austin. The Jazz finished 38-44 and 40-42 in his first two seasons. While the success wasn’t there one factor proved prevalent; development. The continued development of guys like Hayward, Joe Ingles and Gobert allowed the Jazz to compete with the elite teams. The Jazz began to feel like they belonged despite their record.
The third season was the charm for Snyder and the Jazz. Utah added veteran players like Joe Johnson and George Hill for the season. Led by the realization of Gobert and Hayward’s potential, the Jazz won eleven more games than the year prior. Hayward’s 21.9 points, 5.4 rebounds and 3.5 assists averages made him an All-Star. Gobert’s 14.0 points, 12.8 rebounds and 2.6 Blocks averages got him an All-NBA selection. Put those two’s individual accolades together and it meant a playoff berth for the Jazz.
After a 51-31 regular season, the Jazz took care of the Clippers in the first round of the NBA playoffs. Some will say that Snyder out-coached Doc Rivers for much of that series. Not too big of an accomplishment… The Jazz drew the misfortune of playing the Golden State Warriors in the second round.
Snyder was riding high going into the off-season. He’d developed Gobert and Hayward into elite NBA players. While also making the playoffs for the first time.
Things got turned for a loop in July when Gordon Hayward took his talents to Boston in the off-season. Leaving the city that helped him grow him into an All-Star.
Looking at another mini rebuild, Utah traded up to draft Louisville Guard Donovan Mitchell. They also made a trade for Rubio, two moves that would pay dividends this season for Utah.
Snyder’s fourth season started rough as injuries to Gobert caused him to miss heavy time in the first few months of the season. They were now missing both of their top players from the season prior, to begin the season.
In most situations, a coach would panic, and play through middling veteran players to play it safe. Of course, Snyder’s different, he handed the keys to the rookie and said hey, you’re the guy now. Mitchell hasn’t disappointed thus far, turning himself into the clear-cut favorite for NBA Rookie of the Year. Sorry, Ben Simmons.
After a slow start to the year, Utah finds themselves winners of their last ten contests. A team that seemed set to be a ‘tank-a-thon’ contender is now only games out of a playoff spot in the Western Conference. With the addition of Jae Crowder, the Jazz have stocked up solid players around Mitchell and seem geared to a playoff appearance. Which is huge for a rookie.
The Jazz are showing the perseverance of their head coach, and well Snyder is showing the patience and poise that got him to this position. It took 22 long years for Snyder to realize his dream of being an NBA head coach. Through all the turbulence and setbacks, Snyder pushed through to find success. For this reason, he can use his experiences as a teaching tool.
He can convince his players to show determination through any bad times. For the purpose of reaching a goal, nothing’s been to unobtainable for Snyder.
His 22-year journey made him. His experiences shaped him. Snyder’s teachings will lead his group of players to new heights.

For quality up-to-date sports reporting, visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter.

My Name is a David Barr, I am a social media manager for the site. I was born in Massachusetts in the mid-90’s so I’ve had the pleasure of being a fan of winning teams for much of my life. I’ve been spoiled by greatness all these years but yet I’m a miserable cynic about my favorite teams. I was originally brought on the site as a Celtics writer, and I’ll continue to produce NBA pieces despite my social media responsibilities. So look out for my work on the site, and on our various social media accounts.
×
My Name is a David Barr, I am a social media manager for the site. I was born in Massachusetts in the mid-90’s so I’ve had the pleasure of being a fan of winning teams for much of my life. I’ve been spoiled by greatness all these years but yet I’m a miserable cynic about my favorite teams. I was originally brought on the site as a Celtics writer, and I’ll continue to produce NBA pieces despite my social media responsibilities. So look out for my work on the site, and on our various social media accounts.
Latest Posts

LEAVE A REPLY